forking paths

enjoying and exploring the language

found property (2)

Topic: Language

The Telegraph: British languages ‘in danger of dying out within a generation
These are languages you may have not heard about…

Boston.com: Out of the gutter
On slang’s way into the language

Mamalisa.com: Mama Lisa’s World of Nursery Rhymes
An interesting website for (big) children only

The New Yorker: Word
On the language of hip-hop

The Guardian: Bivio – Europe’s greatest linguistic curiosity
How many languages are spoken in some parts of Switzerland? Certainly more than one…

Intelligent Life: OMG, ETC
Acronyms are everywhere

The Economist Debates: Does language shape how we think
Follow the debate to learn more, voice your opinions and even vote

[Sources and inspirations: virtual linguist, The Browser, Langology]

Podcasts

British Council UK Culture: Language (dialects and accents)
BBC Podcasts: Outlook – How a popular Greenland band uses music to encourage teenagers not to take their lives MP3
The New York Times: Backstory (Michael Shear) MP3
NPR: All Things Considered – Prepaid Debit Cards MP3 (transcript)
BBC Comedy: YouTube Channel

Learning English

BBC Learning English: Beaches to reopen after shark attacks (text, audio and activities)
British Council Word Games: Recycling (vocabulary game)
Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary: Clothes (tag cloud, links to topics)
Test your vocabulary (Cambridge): Cambridge English Readers Level Test

Filed under: About the language, English, Learning the language, Linguistics

language links (part 1)

I’d like to start with a bunch of links to websites where you can find interesting content for language learning. I’m not linking to well-known addresses, but places that are worth visiting yet are not present in the mainstream.

1. Antimoon
The website exists thanks to a bunch of Poles who present an original path to language learning. It is both controversial and eye-opening as many of language learners will find out. It does not provide you with much content for language learning per se, but gives you food for thought and a handful of learning techniques. You can also find in-depth dictionary reviews, introduction to pronunciation (together with a possibity to buy software that will help you master this aspect of language) and testimonials of people who have chosen similar path.
What I personally like about this website is the emphasis they put on pronunciation when learning English. I believe that while you undoubtedly need to learn all aspects of the language, pronunciation is often neglected or overly simplified by non-native teachers. Learners do not have to sound British, Australian or American, but word stress and sentence stress is vital if they want to be understood without much trouble.
Follow-up read: Accent and perception (via @LabSpaces) http://is.gd/dzGn1

2. Best of British
This website was founded by a Brit who emigrated to the US and wished to make the difference between British and American versions of English better understood. He even published a book (now unavailable). A great source of vocab, although a bit outdated now.
What I like about this website are the different categories and personal comments of the author. Plus a bit of slang.
Follow-up read: The Economist’s debate http://economist.com/debate/overview/176

Filed under: English, Learning the language, Linguistics, , ,

categorise

in the bushes

Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.

RSS favourites on Twitter

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.